Know Whether or Not You Have Golfer’s Elbow

Golfer’s elbow is a specific condition that affects the tendons in the forearm. The muscles found there are attached to the bump on the inner part of the elbow and pain that begins there may spread into the forearm as well as into the wrist. It’s a lot like tennis elbow which affects the outer part of the elbow. It is called tennis elbow because it affects people who use their wrists and who clench their fingers repeatedly like a tennis player or a golfer might. You don’t have to be a golfer to suffer from pain located there either.

The main symptoms of golfer’s elbow are pain and tenderness. The pain and discomfort felt are normally pinpointed to the area on the inner part of the elbow and can extend up the inner side of the forearm. It will also worsen with particular movements. Your elbow may feel very stiff, and it will probably hurt to make a fist. You will also experience weakness in your wrists, and hands and you may also feel tingling or numbness in your fingers-particularly in the little and ring fingers. The golf elbow pain will come on gradually or quite suddenly and will most likely worsen with movements such as swinging a club or other movements that require using the hands. It is important to watch for the signs of golfer’s elbow so that you will know how to treat it and when you need to go to the doctor.

If you’re experiencing this type of pain and in the areas specified, you should first try applying ice to the affected areas and take some pain relievers to help ease the discomfort. If that does not help you should schedule an appointment with your doctor. You should definitely go to the doctor if you can’t bend your elbow or if your elbow is inflamed and hot and you have a high fever. If your arm looks deformed in any way or if you think that you have broken a bone.

You may be at a higher risk for getting golfer’s elbow if you’re over 40 years of age. Also, if you’re obese, a smoker, or if you perform a repetitive activity daily for a duration of two hours or more. You’re at a much higher risk if you play a sport like tennis or golf and meet some of these qualifications.

You can take precautionary steps to prevent it and lift weights to increase the strength of your forearm muscles. You should also stretch before you do any physical activity and keep proper form. You should use the correct equipment if you’re a golfer. If you’ve really outdated golfing irons, you may want to consider switching to graphite clubs which are lighter. If you frequently play tennis, make sure that your racquet is properly fitted for you. If you begin to feel strained, you should take a break and give it a rest. You’re more likely to pull something if you’re fatigued or tired.